Airport Analytical Firepower

Quarterly Analytics For Airport Professionals

Here’s a hard truth: if you are using any other source of quarterly airport data, you’re probably drawing inaccurate conclusions from incomplete data.

Most sources that sell quarterly reports simply download raw BTS data – which anybody can do for free – and proceed to sort it into a plethora of tables and graphs, and then charge airports exorbitant fees.

They deliver lots of comparisons, maybe, but no real analytical efforts.

Fact: BTS DB1B O&D Data Are Not Complete. So, neither are reports that rely on them exclusively. They miss a lot of information – which is something that many sources of quarterly data probably don’t even know.

A 10% Sample – But Not of All Tickets Sold.  In the purest sense, DB1B data is a set of specific facts extracted from passenger tickets – and what most other sources fail to disclose is that not all tickets used in a quarter are included, just some of them.

Not only that, but it’s further complicated because not all US certificated passenger carriers participate in the sample.

Therefore, the DB1B data other quarterly products rely on are just a 10% sample of less than 100% of all tickets. So those reports are not fully representative of the airline industry.

Aviation DataMiner – Analytics, Instead of Raw Internet Tables. What makes our data better and more accurate is that our advanced Aviation DataMiner system aggregates DB1B information with other  sources of passenger traffic and airline schedules, which results in a more complete database – and a better planning tool for aviation professionals.

Let’s take Shreveport, comparing raw BTS numbers – which other vendors sell after getting downloading them for free – with the fully-reconciled data delivered by the BGI Key Performance Metrics report. The period is full year ending 2Q 2015.

Take a look – in just the top ten metro O&D markets, the raw BTS numbers are over five percent off – in some markets, much more.

This also means that other metrics – such as average fares, yields, trip origination, etc. will also be skewed in the raw and incomplete DB1B data.

The point is that delivering accurate, professional data requires a lot more effort and expertise than just parroting a single federal source.

As with all government data, it’s critical that the reader have a full understanding of what the data represents, how it’s reported, and where the shortfalls are. It’s not for amateurs.

What Sets BGI Ahead: We’re An Aviation Data Company. Boyd Group International is focused as a data and research company. Most of the other sources of “quarterlies” just pull raw – and partial – data off the internet, and pass it off as-is.

Key Performance Metrics – Instead of Pages of Numbers

Volumes of tables and lists are not a planning tool.

The reports in the Key Performance Metrics deliver a wide swath of important analytical insights relating to the airport. For example, here’s what is included with the report on top markets. It’s been split into two sections to fit, by the way…

Okay. Time To Take A Closer Look.

We’ve done a short tour of Key Performance Metrics. Just click here to take a look.

Then, fill out the form below – or just send us an e-mail – and we can start your subscription right away.

If you’re subscribing to another quarterly source, revisit your budget. Even with the superior quality and professionalism of the Boyd Group International Key Performance Metrics, you’ll have several thousand dollars left at the end of the year. Some other sources charge $8,000 or more for what’s essentially public – and not entirely complete – information.

Key Performance Metrics is just $4,450 for a year’s subscription – and that includes a short term forecast every quarter included.

Oh, and by the way… you may want to consider an on-line subscription to Aviation DataMiner, too. It gives enormous analytical access to all airport metrics, as well as schedules and hundreds of reports.

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Future Aviation Insight Series Webinars

Cuba Air Service

The Opportunities for US Airlines & Airports


What Everybody May Be Missing

July 14, 2016, 12:30pm EDT
Register Now!

 

An Important Fact-Webinar,
Thursday, July 14, 12:30PM ET

US airlines now have authority to deliver at least 19,000 weekly seats into Havana…

That’s great news. except Cuba – all of Cuba – has just 60,000 hotel rooms.

This is just part of the math that we’ll be exploring this Thursday – math that the media mostly is missing.

It’s A Huge Potential, But…Make no mistake, Cuba operating authority probably represents the single biggest future expansion opportunity for US airlines and US travel. But it’s a long-term opportunity.

Clear your calendar for a 30-minute webinar analysis of how and when this new market will affect US air travel patterns.

Boyd Group International is the only firm to have accomplished an independent forecast of Cuba-US air demand, and we will be reviewing the key aspects of this new travel

So, get some hard data and perspectives, and join your colleagues this Thursday, July 14, at 12:30PM ET. It will be 30 minutes well invested!

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Airport Analytical Firepower

Quarterly Analytics For Airport Professionals

Here’s a hard truth: if you are using any other source of quarterly airport data, you’re probably drawing inaccurate conclusions from incomplete data.

Most sources that sell quarterly reports simply download raw BTS data – which anybody can do for free – and proceed to sort it into a plethora of tables and graphs, and then charge airports exorbitant fees.

They deliver lots of comparisons, maybe, but no real analytical efforts.

Fact: BTS DB1B O&D Data Are Not Complete. So, neither are reports that rely on them exclusively. They miss a lot of information – which is something that many sources of quarterly data probably don’t even know.

A 10% Sample – But Not of All Tickets Sold.  In the purest sense, DB1B data is a set of specific facts extracted from passenger tickets – and what most other sources fail to disclose is that not all tickets used in a quarter are included, just some of them.

Not only that, but it’s further complicated because not all US certificated passenger carriers participate in the sample.

Therefore, the DB1B data other quarterly products rely on are just a 10% sample of less than 100% of all tickets. So those reports are not fully representative of the airline industry.

Aviation DataMiner – Analytics, Instead of Raw Internet Tables. What makes our data better and more accurate is that our advanced Aviation DataMiner system aggregates DB1B information with other  sources of passenger traffic and airline schedules, which results in a more complete database – and a better planning tool for aviation professionals.

Let’s take Shreveport, comparing raw BTS numbers – which other vendors sell after getting downloading them for free – with the fully-reconciled data delivered by the BGI Key Performance Metrics report. The period is full year ending 2Q 2015.

Take a look – in just the top ten metro O&D markets, the raw BTS numbers are over five percent off – in some markets, much more.

This also means that other metrics – such as average fares, yields, trip origination, etc. will also be skewed in the raw and incomplete DB1B data.

The point is that delivering accurate, professional data requires a lot more effort and expertise than just parroting a single federal source.

As with all government data, it’s critical that the reader have a full understanding of what the data represents, how it’s reported, and where the shortfalls are. It’s not for amateurs.

What Sets BGI Ahead: We’re An Aviation Data Company. Boyd Group International is focused as a data and research company. Most of the other sources of “quarterlies” just pull raw – and partial – data off the internet, and pass it off as-is.

Key Performance Metrics – Instead of Pages of Numbers

Volumes of tables and lists are not a planning tool.

The reports in the Key Performance Metrics deliver a wide swath of important analytical insights relating to the airport. For example, here’s what is included with the report on top markets. It’s been split into two sections to fit, by the way…

Okay. Time To Take A Closer Look.

We’ve done a short tour of Key Performance Metrics. Just click here to take a look.

Then, fill out the form below – or just send us an e-mail – and we can start your subscription right away.

If you’re subscribing to another quarterly source, revisit your budget. Even with the superior quality and professionalism of the Boyd Group International Key Performance Metrics, you’ll have several thousand dollars left at the end of the year. Some other sources charge $8,000 or more for what’s essentially public – and not entirely complete – information.

Key Performance Metrics is just $4,450 for a year’s subscription – and that includes a short term forecast every quarter included.

Oh, and by the way… you may want to consider an on-line subscription to Aviation DataMiner, too. It gives enormous analytical access to all airport metrics, as well as schedules and hundreds of reports.

[wd_contact_form id=”1″]

Going, Gone: The All-Business Class Model

Open Skies – (the airline of that name, not the concept) was another attempt at an independent, all-business class, trans-Atlantic brand.

It’s gone as of this September.

It joins MaxJet, L’Avion and Silverjet on the bucket list of poor market understanding.

These airlines were all based on the assumption that offering a “bargain” premium product would poach business travel from major incumbents, as well as entice the some of the inhabitants of their economy cabins to switch and move up to a classier product.

The fly in this marketing elixir is that the folks in business/first on trans-Atlantic markets tend to be brand-tethered due to corporate deals and FF loyalty. As a group, they aren’t going to switch – and, didn’t.

As for the supposed great unwashed trapped in 17-inch wide seats in the back of the airplane, these premium-product attempts all failed to recognize that it’s not a curtainbetween economy and business class on major carriers.

It’s a financial DMZ.

People book economy class because they don’t want to spend one Euro more to get to Paris, let alone a couple hundred, just to have a wider seat, a meal with fancy names they can’t pronounce, and some free hooch.

10,000th 737 Delivered

Southwest Airlines accepted delivery of an 737-800MAX last week… ten grand later than the first 737 delivered almost 50 years ago.

Actually, Okay Airlines of China sort of stole their thunder in the global av-media, by making a big event of receiving the 9,999th 737  earlier in the week… somehow, it seems more impressive.

Nevertheless, congrats to Boeing, Southwest, and Okay Airlines.

BGI Cuba Air Demand Research Validated

Amid all the excitement surrounding the “opening” of Cuba, Boyd Group International was the only consulting firm to call for some realistic analysis of the market.

Actually, no other consulting entity even said a word – which says a lot.

Our analyses, openly published between 2009 and 2016, clearly warned that the potential US-Cuba market is very limited, and almost entirely one-way. Plus, we warned that the majority of any traffic would come from SE Florida, supported almost entirely by VFR and tour traffic, with a smattering of tour-group movements from a few other US points.

We also pointed out that, other than Havana, demand for US visitation to other cities in the closed-economy of Cuba would essentially be zip.

Frankly, any US airline route planner who would propose flying a domestic market as obviously dismal as most US-Cuba routes would likely be tossed out of the building.

Last week, the DOT “re-allocated” Cuba slots. Or, more correctly, Havana slots, to address the pull-out by Frontier, Spirit, Silver, and Alaska. Most of the re-allocated flying is from SE Florida.

The giant bonanza of feeding traffic to Cuba over US airline hubs was a travel industry mirage.

Our forecasts were alone in illuminating the market realities, all of which ran counter to the ambient thinking: other than SE Florida to Havana, and outside of that, some VFR and adventure tourism, Cuba in its present state is a dog market.

This was not some deepl-buried set of circumstances. One rational look at the market, and the conclusion is clear: Cuba today has very limited potential.

It will remain so until there are major changes in the governance of this workers’ paradise, where free speech, the vote, and any semblance of a business base are still non-existent.

BGI RDU China-Welcome Program Now On-Line 

On February 20, a BGI Team delivered a tailored China-Welcome Symposium at Duke University to the business leaders in the North Carolina Research Triangle.

The focus of the Symposium, sponsored by RDU International Airport, was to outline how the region could capitalize on its already-strong business relationships with China to support a targeted program to bring nonstop flights from China to RDU.

BGI and the team not only outlined the very different structure of the Chinese airline industry, but also delivered insights on how the region can establish a digital presence in China, as well as crafting programs for additional investment from Asia.

The RDU International Airport has made the BGI/China Ni Hao Symposium presentations available, and can be viewed by clicking here.

As the leader in China-US aviation research, BGI and its partners stand ready to assist communities and businesses in crafting programs to increase trade and leisure traffic from China.

ORD Expansion… Forgot Something?

The multi-billion dollar plan to rebuild Chicago/ORD has made a lot of headlines.

Funny, but there’s no mention of the Third Chicago Airport, which supposedly was going to be the panacea for the future, replacing ORD as the main aerodrome in the region.

For the last 20+ years, the land in Will County was going to be the site of the new facility, augmenting ORD.

It was touted as a major jobs creator.

And, indeed, it has been. At least for the folks who’ve done all the “studies” that, gee, all validated the need for the airport.

Fleet Notes: Sukhoi SuperJet Not So Super

Interjet, Mexican airline flying the Russian Sukhoi RRJ95B, has put one of their fleet of 22 into storage, and has officially scrapped two others that had been being  used as parts-bins.

The 100-seat Russian-built aircraft, even with the design participation of a range of suppliers such as Boeing, Curtiss-Wright and Honeywell, has been unable to penetrate any meaningful part of the global aviation marketplace. Reportedly, parts and tech support has been a problem for Mexican carrier Interjet.

The image of the airplane wasn’t helped when one of them flew into a mountain on a demonstration flight in Indonesia in 2012.

Small RJ Reprieve?

In January and February, the AA system has brought back several 37-seat jets into the Eagle fleet.

Some stored for a few years… an expensive process to get them operational again.

Open question is whether these machines are there to make money or defend hub turf.